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Wouldn't it be better to involve people instead of taking and somehow "stealing" their ideas and projects?

Dear DesignProbes Team,

I must say that the complete project, Microbial Home, is really aesthetically well-executed and also it is really interesting as a tool of communication to the wider public, showing a systemic vision and connecting concepts;

if not that i felt absolutely upset and somehow annoyed, about finding in your concepts, the ideas already explored by other researchers and designers. Particularly I refer to my case, by looking at the design which you named "the Paternoster"...i was quite shocked about finding such idea in your project/proposal, as it is very very very similiar (the idea, the components, the organisms, the process...) to a project I previously realized and that is still exhibited, since last June, in Naturalis, Leiden (see http://www.mauriziomontalti.com/officina_corpuscoli/system_syntheti... and also http://www.mauriziomontalti.com/officina_corpuscoli/the_ephemeral_i...).

And the funny thing is that I even got in touch with you earlier, because I would have loved to collaborate with you, being part, as a freelancer, of your design-probes team; and I sent you information about my projects and my reserach. Not only I never got a direct reply from you (if not just a general one from Philips), but I see afterwards, that you're exploiting somebody's else (mine) reserach, without even giving any credit to it, and without even trying to get in touch with me. That's why here I write you to express all my disappointment about such behaviour, and , confident that you will get in touch with me at some point (hopefully soon), I hope it was maybe just a very unlucky "coincidence".... looking forward to your response!

All the best,

MM

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It seems very disappointing indeed.  I hope it was just an unfortunate co-incidence, there is a reasonable chance that the project leader of the Microbial Home never saw or heard about your work, that perhaps your submission was ignored by someone just dealing with correspondence.

At the very least, they should invite you by their base and give you a chance to present your work to their team!

Dear Maurizio,

 

I have forwarded your comment to the Philips Design Probes team. I am positive they will give feedback on your comment as soon as they can. 

thanks,

Hoi Kee Wong, Design Research Consultant at Philips Design

Dear Maurizio, thank you for the links and your thoughts on the Paternoster concept which is very interesting. I do however want to clarify the inspiration for the concept. The Paternoster waste composter is a part of a probe designed to stimulate discussion and debate about household waste and sustainability and is  not intended to become a  product or claim to be developing new technology.. The techniques used in Paternoster are heavily inspired by the pioneering work of Paul Stamets made public in 2005 and various other experts that have demonstrated the transformative effect of mycelium as can be seen on TED talks and on several green issue sites on the internet. These are well-known techniques that have been in the public domain for some time and which we, like many others, have further experimented with. The concept was primarily aimed at children – the elaborate grinding mechanism and mechanical workings are clearly not the most efficient method of converting packaging – they are intentionally amplified to be easily understandable physical models of an accelerated natural process.      

The design of the Paternoster was inspired by antique fob watches dating back to the 16th century. Now, as then, technology was undergoing a fundamental transformation with the application of new scientific understanding. Despite their commitment to scientific principle many of the designers of the first pocket watches hedged their bets by engraving  ‘gargoyle’ type symbols on the mechanical cogs of watches and clocks to chase away evil spirits – just in case the science didn’t work.The Paternoster design was meant to communicate the transition from electro-mechanical technology to the application of simple biological principles based on nature. Myself and Jack Mama were first exposed to antique timepieces in 1990 when we worked with Professor Ian Shanks (a scientist and collector of fob watches) in a research lab at Thorn EMI in the UK where we worked after graduating from the RCA in 1991. We saw the symbolic significance of this technological history and in the  “ghost in the machine” story, which determined the design of Paternoster.

Looking at the 2 links you provide I am impressed with some of the issues you are engaging and I hope you are successful in developing the products and ideas.

Clive van Heerden – Philips Design Probes

Dear Clive,

 

thank you very much for the information and explanations provided.

I really appreciate that as, apart from clarifying some doubts I had, they're

giving me a deeper insight in the work you produced.

 

..and, in case you like and you would be interested to get in touch in the future,

please, do not hesitate to do that.

 

Best wishes,

maurizio

 

 

Clive van Heerden said:

Dear Maurizio, thank you for the links and your thoughts on the Paternoster concept which is very interesting. I do however want to clarify the inspiration for the concept. The Paternoster waste composter is a part of a probe designed to stimulate discussion and debate about household waste and sustainability and is  not intended to become a  product or claim to be developing new technology.. The techniques used in Paternoster are heavily inspired by the pioneering work of Paul Stamets made public in 2005 and various other experts that have demonstrated the transformative effect of mycelium as can be seen on TED talks and on several green issue sites on the internet. These are well-known techniques that have been in the public domain for some time and which we, like many others, have further experimented with. The concept was primarily aimed at children – the elaborate grinding mechanism and mechanical workings are clearly not the most efficient method of converting packaging – they are intentionally amplified to be easily understandable physical models of an accelerated natural process.      

The design of the Paternoster was inspired by antique fob watches dating back to the 16th century. Now, as then, technology was undergoing a fundamental transformation with the application of new scientific understanding. Despite their commitment to scientific principle many of the designers of the first pocket watches hedged their bets by engraving  ‘gargoyle’ type symbols on the mechanical cogs of watches and clocks to chase away evil spirits – just in case the science didn’t work.The Paternoster design was meant to communicate the transition from electro-mechanical technology to the application of simple biological principles based on nature. Myself and Jack Mama were first exposed to antique timepieces in 1990 when we worked with Professor Ian Shanks (a scientist and collector of fob watches) in a research lab at Thorn EMI in the UK where we worked after graduating from the RCA in 1991. We saw the symbolic significance of this technological history and in the  “ghost in the machine” story, which determined the design of Paternoster.

Looking at the 2 links you provide I am impressed with some of the issues you are engaging and I hope you are successful in developing the products and ideas.

Clive van Heerden – Philips Design Probes

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